A number of factors play against the perception most people in the market have about North Carolina Hard Money Lenders. In many cases, the psychology about these lenders is somewhat negative. The misconception is that these more independent lenders are somehow an alternative to the traditional banking institution, as opposed to a clear cut, viable option alongside the traditional banking and financial conglomerate.

And when folks think “alternative” they somehow figure that a service or product from that firm is subpar. This couldn’t be farther from the truth.

And North Carolina Hard Money Lenders are gaining traction amongst more and more of the mainstream sort of borrower. What transpires about the influx and exodus of customers through these lenders’ doors is basically: in economic downturns, their businesses pick up; in upturns, their businesses wind down. But this inverse pattern undoing itself, largely due to disenfranchisement of many in the market with the traditional bank. This disenfranchisement’s been well documented by the blogosphere, and has culminated in congressional hearings against these traditional big box lenders.

But North Carolina Hard Money Lenders aren’t just sitting on the sidelines, passively hoping that customers will buy into the wave of disenfranchisement with traditional banks, and be swayed by this to stay with the less traditional, more independent banking and financing firms because of it. These lenders are pitching their North Carolina hard money solutions aggressively, and they’re seeing yields for these efforts. Many of these firms are anecdotally reporting lesser attrition than is often experienced by these businesses during economic recoveries. In many situations, hard money lenders in North Carolina are in fact seeing more and more interest in their niche services, with customers remarking that hard money and collateralized loans are more flexible and better suiting to a wider array of situations that require financing.

The trend about hard money firms doing better and better, in economically good or bad times, will continue to grow, as the worldwide financial sector continues to evolve—quite predictably in many respects. Those that study politics of the financial sector, see and understand this changing of the guard, from the big box financial conglomerate, over to the smaller independent firms in the market, is in many respects a common hegemonic pattern, in which the so called little guys all work toward toppling the little guy, and the hardmoney lender ends up taking business and customers away from the well established stronghold of the big box banking and financial conglomerate.